Sermon for All Saints Sunday (C) November 3, 2019

Duane Larson, Senior Pastor                     

Based on Luke 6:20-31

Robert Frost wrote that “Half the world is composed of people who have something to say and can’t, and the other half who have nothing to say and keep on saying it.”

As true as this is, on this day, All Saints Sunday, we are more mindful than usual that the saints triumphant who have so much to say are indeed saying it. In fact, they are singing it. They are singing the promises fulfilled of the God who blesses the hungry, the grieving and the abused. Can you hear the singing of the saints? Can you feel the weight of their love for God and you? Do you sense the gravity of the grace in which they and we are steeped? Do you know that their faith now fulfilled in God’s radical generosity means to move each of us in that same direction? Continue reading

Sermon for the Feast of Michael and All Angels September 29, 2019

Duane Larson, Senior Pastor

Daniel 10:10-14; 12:1-3; Revelation 12:7-12; Luke 10:17-20.Today is the feast day of St. Michael and All Angels. It is a “Lesser Festival” always on September 29 and happens today to fall on a Sunday Lutherans typically don’t talk seriously about angels. But why not, and since today’s is convenient for it? Angels heavily populate popular culture; from Precious Moments figurines through myopic cupids, Christmas cards, and creches. There is serious and thoughtful talk about angels throughout almost all religions. And there is, of course, not so thoughtful talk. I personally am not easy with the old Amy Grant song that angels are “watching over me, every move I make.” But let that drippy popsicle simply accent that people everywhere are familiar with the language and the imagery of angels. Continue reading

Fifteenth Sunday after Pentecost September 22, 2019

Karin Liebster, Associate Pastor

Amos 8:4-7
Psalm 113
1 Timothy 2:1-7
Luke 16:1-13

Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ. Amen.
We all serve more than one master!

Think about it. Whether we want it or not, no one serves one master exclusively.

To serve God, to really live a disciple life, live our baptismal calling is a luxury that few of us have, it seems; those who set their lives apart and choose a religious calling; or maybe we think that in retirement we can focus more on serving God alone.

But in real life? We serve many masters. Continue reading