Sunday Forum

9:45 a.m. in the parish hall

Our Sunday Forum series will explore multiple methods of prayer each week that you are invited to “try on” as possibilities to begin or to enrich your own daily spiritual practice.

March 10: Lectio Divina and Visio Divina
Lectio Divina: Reading with the Ear of the Heart
Lectio Divina is an ancient Christian practice in which one reads a small passage of scripture, trusting in God’s presence and relevance in daily experience.  Lectio Divina is not about acquiring head knowledge of Scripture, but is about a personal encounter with the heart of God inspiring one’s attention and already praying through the reader.

Visio Divina: Seeing with the Eye of the Heart
Visio divina shares roots with the ancient practice of lectio divina, inviting one to encounter the divine through images.  A prayerful consideration of and interaction with a photograph in the magazine, icon, piece of art, or other visual representation allows the viewer to experience the sacred in unique and powerful ways.

March 17: Centering Prayer and Walking Meditation
This session in the Lenten discussion of prayer and meditation will focus on two other ways to simply show up with God. One is quiet and still while the other gets us moving in our meditation.    Continue reading

Voting – The Christian Practice of Civic Engagement

Voter registration will be offered after Sunday morning services.

September 23:Voter Registration and Our Faith, Our Voice, Our Choice
Volunteer Deputy Voter Registrar Veronica Nasser of Bellaire, TX, will describe the work of voter registrars, how they organize to go out into the community to register voters and the challenges in doing so. She will speak from her eight years of experience and her outreach in explaining how voting translates into what happens in our communities. Veronica Nasser is a native Houstonian and the owner of Blue Industrial Partners, LLC, natural gas sector company. She is also the Harris County Democratic Party Precinct Chair for Precinct 0182.

What is Moral Injury- March 26, 9:45 a.m.

A growing problem for military personnel, our civic protectors, and others is Moral Injury. Moral Injury most often erupts as a debilitating guilt suffered from an action one has done or witnessed that could not be avoided. MI can be related to, but is distinguishable from Post-Traumatic Stress. MI accounts for much of the increased suicide rate in combat veterans. Can people recover from MI? How can we as people of faith help those who suffer MI? Pastor Larson will introduce the topic on March 26. Whether you can recover damages for emotional distress in a lawsuit will depend upon state laws and the facts of the case. An emotional distress claim is usually brought by plaintiffs who have suffered extreme emotional suffering and trauma resulted from an intentional or accidental injury.

In several states, a physical injury must actually cause the emotional distress. In a minority of states, no physical injury is required if the emotional distress was caused by negligence.
According to the lawyers at Hughes & Coleman Injury Lawyers Louisville Review, you can sue for emotional distress when:

You witness the death or injury of a family member.
You are a bystander to an event that causes fear of death or injury and you are actually in the “zone of danger.”
The deceased body of a family member is mishandled.

The following Sunday Lee Thweatt will join Pastor Larson to lead more conversation about MI. Lee, a member of CTK and Vice-President of the Congregational Council, served as a United States Marine Judge Advocate General (military lawyer) and one of the Hughes & Coleman accident lawyers, and will share first-hand insights about MI.

Faith, Sexism, Justice:

Sunday Forum, February 26, 9:45 a.m. basement classroom
Conversations toward a Social Statement
faith-sexism-justice

Pastor Karin Liebster will lead a three week series reading and discussing the study Faith, Sexism, Justice. The study is a work by the ELCA Taskforce Women and Justice: One in Christ, put forth to all congregations of the ELCA as an invitation to engage in conversation on the topic. The task force writes, “countless people are suffering under the weight on injustice. … Many individuals and their families struggle emotionally, physically and economically because of the effects of sexism and patriarchy. These forces are personal, religious, social and economic. As member of the body of Christ … we are called to help all people live abundant lives that are just and sufficient – lives in which every individual and community is committed to the mutual values of respect, dignity, interdependence and equity.” Continue reading